Category Archives: Essays

Is Nikon DX dying a slow death?

While I was in corporate life one truism was always present in terms of trying to discern competitive strategies, or when managing one’s career and that was – ‘follow the money’. Folks who are successful in managing their corporate careers are always adept at observing where the company is investing its capital. They then try to position themselves as best they can in those functional areas of the organization since that’s where the best opportunities for future advancement will be found.

When trying to discern competitive strategies the same thing holds true since companies will focus their investments where the largest return-on-investment is anticipated. This is especially true of their research and development dollars. Nothing is more telling about what a company thinks about the future than where it chooses to put its R&D investments. Since Nikon has only introduced a couple of DX lenses lately and has filed patents primarily for FX and CX format lenses there is a fundamental question begging to be asked, “Is Nikon DX dying a slow death?” Continue reading Is Nikon DX dying a slow death?

Where should you put your upgrade money?

There are always lots of opinions about specific new camera bodies and lenses. A perpetual stream of new equipment introductions directly fuels gear acquisition syndrome, and many folks get glandular as they read about the latest and greatest technology. “Where should you put your upgrade money?” is a question on a lot of photographers’ minds these days. Continue reading Where should you put your upgrade money?

Professional Development: A Different “Rule of Thirds”

As photographers who regularly visit photography web sites and blogs, we all seem to be driven by very personal commitments to learn new things and to improve. Over the years I’ve been using my own ‘rule of thirds’ – not as a composition technique – but as an approach to help me direct my own development efforts when it comes to photography. Continue reading Professional Development: A Different “Rule of Thirds”