Hummingbird in flight with Nikon 1 J5

I spent a little bit of time at Ruthven Park this morning and got a few usable images of a hummingbird in flight with my Nikon 1 J5.

Since the J5 doesn’t have an EVF I used four, thick elastic bands to attach my Zacuto Z-Finder to the back of the camera.

NOTE: Click on images to enlarge.

DSC_7806_DxOsmall

This worked well enough to keep the Zacuto reasonably snug against the rear screen. I looped my camera strap through the strap on the Z-Finder as an extra precaution just in case the elastics gave way.

Nikon 1 J5 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300mm, efov 810mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-500
Nikon 1 J5 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300mm, efov 810mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-500

Unfortunately I had a jam-packed day and I didn’t have too much time to spend at Ruthven Park. Luckily I had the chance to capture a few, short hand-held image runs of a couple of hummingbirds near a feeder.

Nikon 1 J5 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300mm, efov 810mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-720
Nikon 1 J5 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300mm, efov 810mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-720

I found that the AF-C on my Nikon 1 J5 wasn’t quite as responsive as my V2s, but it still got the job done. It did hesitate slightly when the hummingbird first approached the feeder. I needed to quickly reset my focus using the feeder before I could acquire initial focus on the bird.

Nikon 1 J5 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300mm, efov 810mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-500
Nikon 1 J5 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300mm, efov 810mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-500

Once the J5 acquired initial focus, all of the images in the short AF-C runs were acceptably sharp.

Nikon 1 J5 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300mm, efov 810mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-500
Nikon 1 J5 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300mm, efov 810mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-500

I know a lot of Nikon 1 owners have been patiently waiting for an updated V-series camera, and some have either bought, or are considering, a J5.

Nikon 1 J5 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300mm, efov 810mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-500
Nikon 1 J5 + 1 Nikon CX 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 300mm, efov 810mm, f/5.6, 1/3200, ISO-500

Using a loupe like a Zacuto helps quite a bit when trying to photograph birds in flight. Many photographers would find the performance of the J5 to be acceptable for their bird-in-flight needs.

While the AF-C has a little bit of hesitation in good light it does a credible job. The AF-C frame rate of 20fps quickly fills up the small buffer of the J5, which takes some time to clear. I suggest taking shorter bursts instead of filling the buffer with one image run.

Attaching a loupe to a Nikon 1 J5 does add some bulk and weight, but folks who prefer to shoot with a viewfinder will likely find this to be an acceptable trade-off.

My intent is to keep this photography blog advertising free. If you enjoyed this article and/or my website and would like to make a modest $10 donation through PayPal to support my work it would be most appreciated. You can use the Donate button below. Larger donations can be made to tom@tomstirr.com through PayPal.

You can also support my efforts when you purchase anything from B&H by using the Thomas Stirr affiliate link. Even the smallest purchases will help support this web site.

As a reminder to our Canadian readers, you can get a special 5% discount when ordering Tamron or Rokinon lenses and other products directly from the Amplis Store by using promotion code AMPLIS52018TS.

Article and all images are Copyright 2016 Thomas Stirr. All rights reserved. No use, duplication or adaptation of any kind is allowed without written consent. While we do allow some pre-authorized links to our site from folks like Nikon Canada and Mirrorlessons.com, if you see this article reproduced anywhere else it is an unauthorized and illegal use.

3 thoughts on “Hummingbird in flight with Nikon 1 J5”

    1. Hi Ian,

      Yes it is good fun indeed! It can take a lot of patience…then when a hummingbird does arrive sometimes they are gone so quickly that a person needs to react very quickly.

      Tom

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *