Sample Nikon 1 V3 AF-C image runs

As with the first V3 AF-C image run, the easiest way to view the images in succession is to click on the first one to enlarge it, then continue clicking through the remaining 39 images. You’ll notice that my Nikon 1 V3 grabbed focus immediately with this long, 40 consecutive image AF-C run.

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The wing from the swan on the left hand side of the photograph is creating an optical illusion of a ‘mega wing’.

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No yellow ID tag visible in the image above. Nice wing position with feet extended. Duck in the upper corner is a bit of an issue but otherwise close to a ‘keeper’.

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A minor crop or removal of small portion of the duck on the left-hand side and this image would be a keeper for me.

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With a tight crop on the top of the photograph, the image above would be a keeper.

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The above image would be another ‘tight crop’ keeper.

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Another keeper above.

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I hope these two Nikon 1 V3 AF-C image runs have been useful for you. Rather than simply talking about the V3’s continuous auto-focus performance I thought showing readers a couple of complete V3 AF-C image runs would be more useful.

If it wouldn’t have been for the yellow ID tags these two AF-C runs would have yielded a decent number of usable images.

I was shooting at both 10 fps and 20 fps in AF-C with subject tracking to get these test images for this article. Since I alternated back and forth sporadically I didn’t keep that of which run was at a particular AF-C frame rate. This last run of 40 images took either 2 seconds or 4 seconds to capture with my Nikon 1 V3 – be kind – I’m old with a porous brain!

Technical Note:
All images were captured hand-held in available light using a Nikon 1 V3, 1 Nikon CX 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR zoom len. All images were produced from RAW files using my standard process of DxO OpticsPro 11, CS6 and the Nik Collection. All photographs are presented as captured with no cropping done to any of the images.

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7 thoughts on “Sample Nikon 1 V3 AF-C image runs”

    1. Hi apwang,
      The CX 70-300 seems to have been in short supply since it was introduced. It seems that as soon as camera dealers get them they go off the shelf very quickly.
      Tom

  1. Thanks Tom, I just added the V3 to my arsenal of Nikon 1’s.
    Very anxious to get out and try the bird thing.
    One question, on the V3 you have the option of setting AE/AF L button as a back focus button, do you use this?

    Great photos by-the way.

    1. Hi Jack,
      Yes, you are correct that the V3 can be set to use back button focus. I have not used this feature with the V3. No particular reason for that other than I never used this type of function with my DSLRs either. I’m glad you enjoyed the images!
      Tom

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