E-M1X Hand-held Hi Res 100% Crops

This is a follow-up article to a recent posting, OM-D E-M1X Hand-held Hi Res Images at Bird Kingdom. Further to a request from one of our readers, Colin McNaught, this article features E-M1X Hand-held Hi Res 100% crops and compares them to 100% crops of standard resolution images.

The more I have been experimenting with the Olympus OM-D E-M1X’s Hand-held Hi Res Mode, the more potential that I see with this technology. Rather than just read about it… let’s look at a few real world examples that I photographed over the past two days.

NOTE: Click on images to enlarge.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5.6, 1/2500, ISO-200

I wanted to investigate how well the E-M1X’s Hand-held Hi Res Mode would work when using a fairly long telephoto lens. The image above is a standard 20.4 MP resolution capture. Let’s look at a 100% crop from this photograph. This photograph was captured with the M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 fitted with the M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter. The equivalent field-of-view was 420 mm.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5.6, 1/2500, ISO-200, 100% crop

Let’s compare it with a Hand-held Hi Res Mode photograph of the same subject, along with a 100% crop of the Hi Res image.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5.6, 1/2500, ISO-200, Hand-held Hi Res Mode
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5.6, 1/2500, ISO-200, Hand-held Hi Res Mode, 100% crop

Now let’s compare some photographs of a discarded coffee cup lid in the mud. First a standard resolution image, followed by a 100% crop.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5.6, 1/800, ISO-200
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5.6, 1/800, ISO-200, 100% crop

And, now the E-M1X’s Hand-held Hi Res capture, followed by a 100% crop.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5.6, 1/800, ISO-200, Hand-held Hi Res Mode
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/5.6, 1/800, ISO-200, Hand-held Hi Res Mode, 100% crop

When I was out doing some landscape photographs for the J5 comparison with the OM-D E-M1 Mark II, I came across a very small toy that had been left in a public gazebo. First the standard resolution image and 100% crop of it, then a Hand-held Hi Res Mode photograph and 100% crop.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/8, 1/200, ISO-400
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/8, 1/200, ISO-400, 100% crop
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/8, 1/200, ISO-400, Hand-held Hi Res Mode
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 40-150 mm f/2.8 PRO with M.Zuiko 1.4X teleconverter @ 210 mm, efov 420 mm, f/8, 1/200, ISO-400, Hand-held Hi Res Mode, 100% crop

Now we’ll look at some subject matter that you are likely expecting to see in this article. A flower photographed at standard resolution, with a 100% crop. Then the same blossom captured using the E-M1X’s Hand-held Hi Res Mode, with a 100% crop. After these flower images… we’ll have a look at two things you’re probably not expecting to see.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 12-100 mm f/4 IS PRO, @ 100 mm, efov 200 mm, f/5.6, 1/320, ISO-1600
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 12-100 mm f/4 IS PRO, @ 100 mm, efov 200 mm, f/5.6, 1/320, ISO-1600, 100% crop
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 12-100 mm f/4 IS PRO, @ 100 mm, efov 200 mm, f/5.6, 1/320, ISO-1600, Hand-held Hi Res Mode
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 12-100 mm f/4 IS PRO, @ 100 mm, efov 200 mm, f/5.6, 1/320, ISO-1600, Hand-held Hi Res Mode, 100% crop

OK… now for something a little different. The next set of images that you will see are of my left hand. I captured these images holding the Olympus OM-D E-M1X with my right hand, with the camera pressed up against my chest for support.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 12-100 mm f/4 IS PRO, @ 100 mm, efov 200 mm, f/8, 1/50, ISO-6400
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 12-100 mm f/4 IS PRO, @ 100 mm, efov 200 mm, f/8, 1/50, ISO-6400, 100% crop
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 12-100 mm f/4 IS PRO, @ 100 mm, efov 200 mm, f/8, 1/50, ISO-6400, Hand-held Hi Res Mode
Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 12-100 mm f/4 IS PRO, @ 100 mm, efov 200 mm, f/8, 1/50, ISO-6400, Hand-held Hi Res Mode, 100% crop

If you have wondered about the sharpness of the M.Zuiko 12-100 f/4 IS PRO lens, or the IBIS system in the OM-D E-M1X body have a good look at the hand images above. Remember… these photographs were captured one-handed. Look at the EXIF data… 1/50th of a second with an equivalent field-of-view of 200 mm. The photographs that you are looking at are straight-out-of-camera jpegs captured at ISO-6400.

Well… let’s have a look at our final sample. I do not have a standard resolution version of this photograph. Once you see it you will understand why I only had time to capture a single Hand-held Hi Res Mode image.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 12-100 mm f/4 IS PRO, @ 100 mm, efov 200 mm, f/5.6, 1/500, ISO-2000, Hand-held Hi Res Mode

You may be wondering why I would capture this image. See that tiny, little ant on the flower bud? It was actually my intended test subject.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X + M.Zuiko 12-100 mm f/4 IS PRO, @ 100 mm, efov 200 mm, f/5.6, 1/500, ISO-2000, Hand-held Hi Res Mode, 100% crop

If you look hard, you can see some hairs on the back of the ant’s body. How’s that for detail?

Some reviewers apparently think that the Olympus OM-D E-M1X Hand-held Hi Res Mode is just a gimmick, or that it isn’t very practical to use. I can unequivocally say that I disagree.

Technical Note:
All photographs in this article were captured using camera gear as noted in the EXIF data. Many images were produced using the Olympus Hand-held Hi Res Shot Mode. All photographs displayed in this article are straight-out-of-camera jpegs. They were resized to 1200 pixels for web use. 100% crops of each image are included.

Use of Olympus Loaner Equipment
All of the photographs in this article were captured using Olympus Loaner Gear which was supplied by Olympus Americas Inc. on a no-charge basis. We are under no obligation what-so-ever to Olympus Americas Inc. in terms of our use of this loaner Olympus camera equipment. There is no expectation or agreement of any kind with Olympus Americas Inc. that we will create and share with readers any images, articles or videos, or on what that content may be.

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6 thoughts on “E-M1X Hand-held Hi Res 100% Crops”

  1. Outstanding work as always! Very interesting results.
    (I think you mis-labeled the 12-100 IS PRO lens as f2.8 instead of f4, it’s my default carry hiking lens).
    I’m hoping you will post results when DxO PhotoLab supports the E-M1X
    I would be very interested to see, instead of 100% crop on both HiRes and standard, a crop that resulted in the same actual subject FOV.

    1. Hi Colin,

      Thanks for catching my errors in the EXIF data with regards to the M.Zuiko 12-100 mm f/4 lens! I had keyboarded one passage, copy and pasted it in for each image, then made edits depending on the specifics of the photograph. I obviously missed changing the aperture designation on the 12-100 mm lens.

      DxO PhotoLab indicates that the OM-D E=M1X modules are scheduled for release in June 2019… although there is no exact date. I am very much looking forward to being able to work withE-M1X RAW files.

      Tom

  2. Hi Tom,

    I agree, you’d make a great Olympus ambassador.
    While I know you’re scouting for possible additions / amendments to your Nikon 1 gear for video, I think Olympus Canada/North America has an opportunity here to partner with you for both still/video capture as can be seen in this post.

    Oggie
    http://www.lagalog.com

    1. Hi Oggie,

      Thank you for your generous and kind words… they are appreciated!

      Thus far I have been quite impressed with the Olympus Loaner Gear. I’ve mainly been using the 12-100 f/4 and the 40-150 mm f/2.8 with the 1.4X teleconverter… both are excellent. I will probably go out next week to spend some time in the field with the 7-14 mm f/2.8.

      I have been quite surprised with how comfortable it is to use the E-M1X for it being such a ‘large’ camera. The body isn’t that thick so the E-M1X isn’t as heavy as I initially thought it would be… roughly the same as the D800 that I used to own. The ergonomics and handling of the E-M1X are excellent. Pigeon-holing the E-M1X as a ‘sports and wildlife’ camera does the E-M1X a great disservice. It is a wonderful, well-rounded camera.

      I still have so much to learn about using the Olympus gear! It will certainly take some time before I am really comfortable using it.

      Tom

  3. Tom,
    You would make a great Olympus ambassador!

    The Olympus M1X setup with the 40-150mm lens plus the 1.4TC must weigh about two or three times as much as as your equivalent Nikon 1 setup. Has that been an issue for you?

    Have you assessed the acceptable (to you) ISO range of the M1X?

    Have you printed any of your M1X photos, and, if so, how do they compare to your prints from the Nixon 1 or older prints you made with your previous Nikon DSLR?

    Jack

    1. Hi Jack,

      Thanks for the supportive comment – most appreciated!

      To answer your questions…

      1) Yes, the set-up is much heavier than my Nikon 1 kit. I don’t find the 40-150 with teleconverter comfortable to use with the OM-D E-M1 Mark II body as the grip on that camera is a bit small for my hands. The OM-D E-M1X, although it is a heavier camera than the E-M1 Mark II, I find it much more comfortable for me to use. I’ve been out with the E-M1X with the 40-150 for 4-5 hours at a time and I did not get fatigued.

      2) DxO PhotoLab doesn’t have RAW support for the E-M1X yet. I haven’t done any processing of RAW files in post so it is a bit premature for me to assess low light photography. My main objective for potentially buying some Olympus gear is not for still photography. It is for my client video productions. Based on the jpeg quality of the E-M1X I am anticipating being able to shoot the E-M1X to at least ISO-3200, and quite possibly ISO-6400 without any hesitation. I will need to get some experience processing RAW files before I can make that final determination.

      3) I have not printed any E-M1X photos yet as I never print anything from a jpeg file. After DxO PhotoLab provides modules for the E-M1X I will be able to do some print tests based on RAW processed files.

      Tom

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